News and Customer Spotlight


Harry Hutchison to Receive Service to Mankind Award

Harry Hutchison, 60, of Hillsboro has been selected the Hillsboro SERTOMA Club's Service to Mankind recipient for 2017. A banquet honoring Hutchison will be held at the Hillsboro Lions Club on Wednesday, March 22. The public is invited to attend. Tickets are $15 each and are available from any SERTOMA Club member or by calling John Galer 710-7319 or Kevin Leitheiser 259-5788 or at The Journal-News office. The program will start at 6:30 p.m. with Milanos Catering providing the meal. Mike Ryan will be the guest speaker.

Hutchison exhibits service in his daily life and has been active in giving back to his community and the world. An active member of the Knights of Columbus for over 20 years, he has led that organization's work with local FAYCO clients. He was Grand Knight in 1996-1997. He has also participated in efforts to enhance the community as a member of an Imagine Hillsboro sub-committee member, and is a Montgomery County Economic Development Corporation past board member. He also participated in the task force to build a new high school. He was president of National Bank from 2000 to 2016 and was instrumental in building the new National Bank headquarters in downtown Hillsboro.

Hutchison has participated in seven trips to Guatemala to help improve the lives of impoverished residents. As part of a team, he has built stoves for cooking in homes near the village of San Cristobal. "It literally changes their lives," he stated. The stoves replace open fires used for cooking, helps save wood and is safer for the families. A graduate of Eastern Illinois University in 1987 he worked for Fleming CPA for seven years and started with Montgomery County National Bank in 1994. He is married to Lynne Hutchison, DNP, and has two children, two stepchildren and one granddaughter. His first wife Debbie passed away in 1999. (From the Journal News - March 02, 2017)


Treasury Securities that Have Stopped Earning Interest

Do you have savings bonds that have matured and stopped earning interest? If so, it's time to cash them in, or reinvest them, and have your money start working for you again.

It's important to check your savings bonds periodically to determine if they're still earning interest, and if they're not, they should be redeemed. Use the tables below to determine whether your bonds have stopped earning interest, or for how long you can expect them to earn interest. (You should keep a list of your bonds, by serial number, in a safe location and separate from the actual bonds.)

You can also check Treasury Hunt, if you're not sure whether you own any bonds that have matured. This system provides information only and doesn’t give you status of your bonds. For status, you need to contact: Treasury Retail Securities Site, P.O. Box 2186, Minneapolis, MN 55480-2186

Also, marketable securities are subject to bond calls, cases where the Treasury stops paying interest on bonds before the scheduled maturity date. Be sure to note your security's maturity date and check the website for bond calls.

NOTE: Marketable securities - U. S. Treasury bills, notes, bonds, Floating Rate Notes, and Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) - have maturities ranging from a few days to 30 years. The following savings bonds no longer earn interest:

SERIES ISSUE DATE
E All issues
EE January 1980 through December 1986
H All issues
HH January 1980 through December 1996
Savings Notes All issues
A, B, C, D, F, G, J, K All issues

How long savings bonds earn interest, based on issue date:

SERIES ISSUE DATE NUMBER OF YEARS BONDS EARN INTEREST
E May 1941- November 1965 40 years
December 1965 - June 1980 30 years
EE All issues 30 years
H June 1952- January 1957 29 years, 8 months
February 1957- December 1979 30 years
HH All issues
I All issues 30 years
Savings Notes All issues 30 years

Misty Borrowman named National Bank President; appointed Director

The Board of Directors of National Bank recently promoted Misty Borrowman to President. Borrowman was also appointed to the Bank’s Board of Directors. Harry Hutchison, who formerly held the position of President, will assume the position of President of National Bank’s Parent Company, Country Bancorp, Inc. Hutchison noted, “The promotion for Misty is well deserved. She has exhibited prudent management and excellent leadership skills which will enable National Bank to continue to flourish as a community bank.” As President and CEO, Borrowman heads up a solid executive management team of Sheila White, EVP/COO; Justin Holderread, EVP/Senior Lender; Harold Newman, EVP of Commercial Lending; and Steve Grundy, EVP of Agricultural Lending.

Headshot of Misty Borrowman

Regarding her new role, Borrowman noted, “I am honored to have this opportunity to lead National Bank’s talented team as we grow and evolve in an ever-changing industry. I look forward to expanding on the strong foundation we have built under Harry’s leadership. Together, we will continue to help our customers meet their financial needs and goals, which ultimately strengthens the communities in which we operate.”

Borrowman joined National Bank in early 2010 as Chief Financial Officer and was promoted to Chief Executive Officer in 2015. Her previous career experience includes 11 years with Anheuser-Busch in St. Louis, where she worked in Corporate Accounting and later as the Executive Assistant to the VP of Human Resources. Prior to Anheuser-Busch, Borrowman was with KPMG Peat Marwick in St. Louis as a financial institutions auditor. Borrowman is a CPA and attended Western Illinois University. She currently serves as a Director and Treasurer for the Montgomery CEO Program.

Misty Borrowman lives on a small farm in southern Montgomery County with her husband, Tim, and their five children. The family raises registered Boer goats, a few cattle and hay.


A Bank Customer’s Guide to Cyber Security from the FDIC

What Consumers Can Do ... and What Banks and Regulators Are Doing ... to Help Prevent Online Fraud and Theft.

  • Safety precautions for Internet banking or shopping
  • How to avoid identity theft online
  • The roles of banks and the government in protecting customers
  • Additional resources from the FDIC that can help educate consumer

Click on the newsletter below for the following articles:

Protect Your “Cyber Home” With a Solid Foundation
Simple steps to secure your computers and mobile devices for Internet banking and shopping
Going Mobile: How to be Safer When Using a Smartphone or Tablet

What Banks and Bank Regulators are Doing to Protect Customers From Cyberthreats

Beware of Malware: Think Before You Click!

Beware of Phishing Scams: Don’t Take the Bait

Using Social Networking Sites: Be Careful What You Share

For Parents and Caregivers: Tips for Protecting Your Child’s Personal Information

How Federal Laws and Industry Practices Limit Losses From Cyberattacks

Cybersecurity for Small Businesses: Ways to Stay Protected


Montgomery County CEO Program Offers Experiential Entrepreneur Learning for High School Seniors

The Montgomery County CEO Program seeks to prepare people, especially youth, to be responsible, enterprising individuals who become entrepreneurs or entrepreneurial thinkers and contribute to economic development and sustainable communities. The CEO program is much more than a textbook course. Rather, students are immersed in real life learning experiences with the opportunity to take risks, manage the results, and learn from the outcomes. The program is an experiential entrepreneur class for high school seniors and is funded and guided by the business community in cooperation with the area high schools.

A total of 46 businesses in the county are involved as investors in the program. National Bank, headquartered in Hillsboro, is not only an investor but has hosted CEO Program activities and is proud to have Misty Borrowman, CEO of National Bank as one of the Board Members.

The CEO Program is dedicated to providing entrepreneurial leadership in communities across the country.


CUSTOMER SPOTLIGHT: Max B. Mullins and Mayfield’s Landscaping

Peak season runs 12 months out of the year for Max B. Mullins and Mayfield’s Landscaping. The business has grown from a local produce and seasonal garden center to cover more than six counties with their landscaping and snow removal crews

he five Mayfield brothers and two sisters opened Mayfield Brothers in 1987 at the busy corner of Main and Hibbard in Staunton, Illinois. With the help of family, the business has continued to expand into offering a complete line of landscaping supplies and unique and handcrafted gifts.

In the summer of 2000, Mayfield Brothers Produce expanded into landscaping and lawn care to become Mayfields residential Landscaping. Over the next few years, the company moved into commercial landscaping, offering the addition of 24/7 snow removal. Today the residential-commercial landscaping mix stands at around 50/50.

Local businessman and owner of Max B. Mullins Salvage, Max Mullins married Rebekah Mullins in 2010 and purchased Mayfield’s Landscaping in 2013. National Bank had worked with Mr. Mullins for many years, helping to expand his growing salvage business and provided the financing to help Max B. Mullins and Mayfield’s Landscaping continue their growth and expansion. “National Bank enjoyed the opportunity to help with the continued growth of a long standing local business,” says Steve Grundy, EVP Loan Officer for National Bank.

Max B. Mullins and Mayfield’s is still at the busy corner of Main and Hibbard with an extensive selection of landscaping supplies and gifts, but also runs an ever increasing fleet of landscaping, mowing and snow removal equipment. Now with over 25 employees, Max B. Mullins and Mayfield’s serves larger commercial customers like McDonalds, Denny’s, local school districts and many office and retail establishments. The company is now managed by Carrie Borgini, a third generation Mayfield. “We’re excited to celebrate 30 years in business in 2017. Business has certainly changed throughout the years but is proudly run by the Mayfield family, at the same location started by my father, uncle and aunts,” says Carrie Borgini. Time marches on and the seasons change, opening up opportunities that keep Max B. Mullins and Mayfields Landscaping busy and growing all year round.